Infinite Image

Photo 1 from 'Infinite Image' 33 inkjet prints on Canson Baryta paper
3 sizes:
63 x 50 cm
48 x 38 cm
32 x 25.4 cm
Edition of five

Photo 2 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 3 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 4 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 5 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 6 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 7 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 8 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 9 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 10 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 11 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 12 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 13 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 14 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 15 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 16 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 17 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 18 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 19 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 20 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 21 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 22 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 23 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 24 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 25 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 26 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 27 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 28 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 29 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 30 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 31 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 32 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 33 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 34 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 35 from 'Infinite Image' Photo 36 from 'Infinite Image'
Infinite Image explores the infinite malleability of the digital image.
 
For many years, Fereday has re-photographed small details of magazine advertisements to resemble classic 'UFO photos', which she presents alongside suspended glass and metal plates that also mimic UFO forms. Her arrangements of suspended mirrors and plates, along with the shadows and refracted shapes they cast onto the gallery walls, evoke the displacement of desire through the allure of commodity fetishism. They 'earth' the photographic imagery, sharing their correlation of shape, and re-presenting their banal materiality as spectacle.
 
If the object of photography is the illusion of the object and a reflection of our desire for the image, then in the digital era that object is vast in ambition and infinite in potential.